Randomized clinical trial of telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce post-traumatic stress disorder and distress symptoms after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation Journal Article


Authors: Duhamel, K. N.; Mosher, C. E.; Winkel, G.; Labay, L. E.; Rini, C.; Meschian, Y. M.; Austin, J.; Greene, P. B.; Lawsin, C. R.; Rusiewicz, A.; Grosskreutz, C. L.; Isola, L.; Moskowitz, C. H.; Papadopoulos, E. B.; Rowley, S.; Scigliano, E.; Burkhalter, J. E.; Hurley, K. E.; Bollinger, A. R.; Redd, W. H.
Article Title: Randomized clinical trial of telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce post-traumatic stress disorder and distress symptoms after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation
Abstract: Purpose A significant number of survivors of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) report enduring adverse effects of treatment, including illness-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and general distress. We report results of a randomized clinical trial that tested the effects of a 10-session, telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention on PTSD, depression, and distress symptoms. Methods Survivors who had undergone HSCT 1 to 3 years earlier (N = 408) were assessed for study eligibility. Those who met study eligibility criteria (n = 89) completed a baseline assessment that included a clinical interview and self-report measures of PTSD symptoms (the primary outcome) and depression and general distress (the secondary outcomes). Next, they were randomly assigned to CBT or an assessment-only condition. Survivors in the CBT group completed 10 individual telephone-based CBT sessions (T-CBT) that included strategies to reduce PTSD symptoms, depression, and general distress. Follow-up assessments occurred at 6, 9, and 12 months after the baseline assessment. Results Linear mixed-model analyses revealed that, compared with HSCT survivors in the assessment-only condition, survivors who completed T-CBT reported fewer illness-related PTSD symptoms, including less avoidance (P < .001) and fewer intrusive thoughts (P < .05) as well as less general distress and fewer depressive symptoms (P < .05) even after controlling for potential demographic and medical covariates. These results were consistent across the three follow-up assessments. Conclusion A brief, telephone-administered CBT intervention developed for HSCT survivors is an efficacious treatment for reducing illness-related PTSD symptoms and general distress. J Clin Oncol 28: 3754-3761. (C) 2010 by American Society of Clinical Oncology
Keywords: survivors; depression; guidelines; intervention; metaanalysis; breast-cancer patients; bone-marrow-transplantation; checklist; assault victims; ptsd
Journal Title: Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume: 28
Issue: 23
ISSN: 0732-183X
Publisher: American Society of Clinical Oncology  
Date Published: 2010-08-10
Start Page: 3754
End Page: 3761
Language: English
ACCESSION: ISI:000281129000013
DOI: 10.1200/jco.2009.26.8722
PROVIDER: wos
PMCID: PMC2917309
PUBMED: 20625129
Notes: --- - Article - "Source: Wos"
Altmetric Score
MSK Authors
  1. Craig Moskowitz
    372 Moskowitz
  2. Katherine N Duhamel
    88 Duhamel
  3. Karen E Hurley
    45 Hurley
  4. Catherine E Mosher
    23 Mosher
  5. Paul B Greene
    2 Greene