Colorectal cancer screening participation among Asian Americans overall and subgroups in an integrated health care setting with organized screening Journal Article


Authors: Ghai, N. R.; Jensen, C. D.; Corley, D. A.; Doubeni, C. A.; Schottinger, J. E.; Zauber, A. G.; Lee, A. T.; Contreras, R.; Levin, T. R.; Lee, J. K.; Quinn, V. P.
Article Title: Colorectal cancer screening participation among Asian Americans overall and subgroups in an integrated health care setting with organized screening
Abstract: Background: Screening reduces colorectal cancer deaths, but <50% of Asian Americans are screening up-to-date according to surveys, with variability across Asian subgroups. We examined colorectal cancer screening participation among Asian Americans overall and Asian subgroups in a large integrated health care system with organized screening. Methods: Data were electronically accessed to characterize screening in 2016 for Asians overall and subgroups relative to the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable target of ≥80% screening and compared with non-Hispanic whites. Screening up-to-date was defined as a colonoscopy with 10 years, a sigmoidoscopy within 5 years, or a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) completed in 2016. Results: Among 436,398 patients, 69,826 (16.0%) were Asian, of whom 79.8% were screening up-to-date vs. 77.6% of non-Hispanic whites (p < 0.001). Almost all subgroups met the 80% target: Chinese (83.3%), Vietnamese (82.4%), Korean (82.1%), other Asian (80.3%), Filipino (78.7%), Asian Indian (79.6%), and Japanese (79.0%). Among Asians overall and non-Hispanic whites, 50.6% and 48.4% of members were up-to-date with screening by colonoscopy, and 28.0% and 28.2% were up-to-date by FIT, respectively. Across Asian subgroups, colonoscopy most frequently accounting for being screening up-to-date (range: 47.4–59.7%), followed by FIT (range: 21.6–31.5%). Conclusions: In an organized screening setting, there were minimal differences in screening participation among Asian subgroups and almost all met the 80% screening target, despite differences in language preference. Screening test type differences across subgroups suggest possible preferences in screening modality, which can inform future research into tailored education or outreach. © 2018, The Author(s).
Keywords: adult; middle aged; major clinical study; colorectal cancer; patient education; cancer screening; patient participation; program evaluation; colonoscopy; sigmoidoscopy; asian american; asian; indian; chinese; occult blood test; integrated health care system; human; male; female; priority journal; article; japanese (people); filipino (people); korean (people); vietnamese
Journal Title: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology
Volume: 9
Issue: 9
ISSN: 2155-384X
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group  
Date Published: 2018-09-21
Start Page: 186
Language: English
DOI: 10.1038/s41424-018-0051-2
PUBMED: 30242160
PROVIDER: scopus
PMCID: PMC6155113
DOI/URL:
Notes: Article -- Export Date: 1 November 2018 -- Source: Scopus
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  1. Ann G Zauber
    261 Zauber