Screening, assessment, and management of fatigue in adult survivors of cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline adaptation Journal Article


Authors: Bower, J. E.; Bak, K.; Berger, A.; Breitbart, W.; Escalante, C. P.; Ganz, P. A.; Schnipper, H. H.; Lacchetti, C.; Ligibel, J. A.; Lyman, G. H.; Ogaily, M. S.; Pirl, W. F.; Jacobsen, P. B.
Article Title: Screening, assessment, and management of fatigue in adult survivors of cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline adaptation
Abstract: Purpose: This guideline presents screening, assessment, and treatment approaches for the management of adult cancer survivors who are experiencing symptoms of fatigue after completion of primary treatment. Methods: A systematic search of clinical practice guideline databases, guideline developer Web sites, and published health literature identified the pan-Canadian guideline on screening, assessment, and care of cancer-related fatigue in adults with cancer, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Clinical Practice Guidelines In Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Cancer-Related Fatigue and the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship. These three guidelines were appraised and selected for adaptation. Results: It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for the presence of fatigue after completion of primary treatment and be offered specific information and strategies for fatigue management. For those who report moderate to severe fatigue, comprehensive assessment should be conducted, and medical and treatable contributing factors should be addressed. In terms of treatment strategies, evidence indicates that physical activity interventions, psychosocial interventions, and mind-body interventions may reduce cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment patients. There is limited evidence for use of psychostimulants in the management of fatigue in patients who are disease free after active treatment. Conclusion: Fatigue is prevalent in cancer survivors and often causes significant disruption in functioning and quality of life. Regular screening, assessment, and education and appropriate treatment of fatigue are important in managing this distressing symptom. Given the multiple factors contributing to post-treatment fatigue, interventions should be tailored to each patient's specific needs. In particular, a number of nonpharmacologic treatment approaches have demonstrated efficacy in cancer survivors.
Keywords: exercise; therapy; breast-cancer; quality-of-life; randomized controlled-trial; physical-activity; metaanalysis; care; interventions; inventory
Journal Title: Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume: 32
Issue: 17
ISSN: 0732-183X
Publisher: American Society of Clinical Oncology  
Date Published: 2014-06-10
Start Page: 1840
End Page: 1850
Language: English
ACCESSION: WOS:000337239600018
DOI: 10.1200/jco.2013.53.4495
PROVIDER: wos
PMCID: PMC4039870
PUBMED: 24733803
Notes: Article -- Source: Wos
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MSK Authors
  1. William S Breitbart
    338 Breitbart
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