Risk of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer in noncarriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with a family history of breast cancer: a report from the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study Journal Article


Authors: Reiner, A. S.; John, E. M.; Brooks, J. D.; Lynch, C. F.; Bernstein, L.; Mellemkjær, L.; Malone, K. E.; Knight, J. A.; Capanu, M.; Teraoka, S. N.; Concannon, P.; Liang, X.; Figueiredo, J. C.; Smith, S. A.; Stovall, M.; Pike, M. C.; Haile, R. W.; Thomas, D. C.; Begg, C. B.; Bernstein, J. L.
Article Title: Risk of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer in noncarriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with a family history of breast cancer: a report from the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study
Abstract: To fully characterize the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) in patients with breast cancer with a family history who test negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. From our population-based case-control study comparing women with CBC to women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC), we selected women who tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (594 patients with CBC/1,119 control patients with UBC). Rate ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated to examine the association between family history of breast cancer and risk of asynchronous CBC. Age- and family history-specific 10-year cumulative absolute risks of CBC were estimated. Family history of breast cancer was associated with increased CBC risk; risk was highest among young women (< 45 years) with first-degree relatives affected at young ages (< 45 years; RR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 5.3) or women with first-degree relatives with bilateral disease (RR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.4). Women diagnosed with UBC before age 55 years with a first-degree family history of CBC had a 10-year risk of CBC of 15.6%. Young women with breast cancer who have a family history of breast cancer and who test negative for deleterious mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are at significantly greater risk of CBC than other breast cancer survivors. This risk varies with diagnosis age, family history of CBC, and degree of relationship to an affected relative. Women with a first-degree family history of bilateral disease have risks of CBC similar to mutation carriers. This has important implications for the clinical management of patients with breast cancer with family history of the disease.
Keywords: adult; aged; middle aged; case control study; genetics; mutation; case-control studies; united states; odds ratio; risk factors; breast neoplasms; brca1 protein; brca2 protein; heterozygote; risk factor; risk assessment; risk; breast tumor; neoplasms, second primary; second cancer; brca1 protein, human; reproductive history; brca2 protein, human
Journal Title: Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume: 31
Issue: 4
ISSN: 0732-183X
Publisher: American Society of Clinical Oncology  
Date Published: 2013-02-01
Start Page: 433
End Page: 439
Language: English
DOI: 10.1200/jco.2012.43.2013
PUBMED: 23269995
PROVIDER: scopus
PMCID: PMC3731919
DOI/URL:
Notes: --- - "Export Date: 1 April 2013" - "Source: Scopus"
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MSK Authors
  1. Anne S Reiner
    120 Reiner
  2. Malcolm Pike
    132 Pike
  3. Colin B Begg
    236 Begg
  4. Marinela Capanu
    206 Capanu
  5. Jonine L Bernstein
    101 Bernstein
  6. Jennifer Brooks
    17 Brooks
  7. Xiaolin Liang
    41 Liang