Associations of physical and psychologic symptom burden in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms Journal Article


Authors: McFarland, D. C.; Shaffer, K. M.; Polizzi, H.; Mascarenhas, J.; Kremyanskaya, M.; Holland, J.; Hoffman, R.
Article Title: Associations of physical and psychologic symptom burden in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms
Abstract: Background: The physical symptom burden of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) may last for extended periods during their disease trajectories and lead to psychologic distress, anxiety, or depression or all of these. Objective: This study evaluated the relationship between physical symptom burden captured by the Physical Problem List (PPL) on the Distress Thermometer and Problem List and psychologic outcomes (distress, anxiety, and depression) in the MPN setting. Methods: Patients (N = 117) with MPNs completed questionnaires containing the Distress Thermometer and Problem List and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in a dedicated MPN clinic within an academic medical center. They reported symptoms from any of 22 physical problems on the PPL. Items endorsed by more than 10% of participants were assessed for their associations with distress (Distress Thermometer and Problem List), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety), and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression). The total number of endorsed PPL items per participant was also evaluated. Results: Nine of 22 PPL items (fatigue, sleep, pain, dry skin/pruritus, memory/concentration, feeling swollen, breathing, and sexual) were reported by >10% of participants. In univariate analyses, all PPL items but one were associated with distress and depression, and all but 2 were associated with anxiety. In multivariate analyses, the total number of PPL items was associated with depression only (p < 0.001) when controlling for covariates. Conclusion: Physical symptom burden in MPN patients was clearly associated with psychologic symptoms. Depression was uniquely associated with overall physical symptom burden. As such, the endorsement of multiple PPL items on the Distress Thermometer and Problem List should prompt an evaluation for psychologic symptoms to improve MPN patients’ overall morbidity and quality of life. © 2018 Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry.
Keywords: depression; anxiety; distress; myeloproliferative neoplasms; distress thermometer and problem list; physical symptom burden
Journal Title: Psychosomatics
Volume: 59
Issue: 5
ISSN: 0033-3182
Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc.  
Date Published: 2018-09-01
Start Page: 472
End Page: 480
Language: English
DOI: 10.1016/j.psym.2018.01.006
PROVIDER: scopus
PMCID: PMC6067992
PUBMED: 29506868
DOI/URL:
Notes: Article -- Export Date: 1 November 2018 -- Source: Scopus
Altmetric
Citation Impact
MSK Authors
  1. Jimmie C B Holland
    304 Holland
  2. Kelly M Shaffer
    22 Shaffer