Predictors of satisfaction with doctor and nurse communication: A national study Journal Article


Authors: McFarland, D. C.; Johnson Shen, M.; Holcombe, R. F.
Article Title: Predictors of satisfaction with doctor and nurse communication: A national study
Abstract: Prior research indicates that effective communication between medical providers and patients is associated with a number of positive patient outcomes, yet little research has examined how ecological factors (e.g., hospital size, local demographics) influence patients’ reported satisfaction with doctor and nurse communication. Given the current emphasis on improving patient satisfaction in hospitals across the United States, understanding these factors is critical to interpreting patient satisfaction and improving patient-centered communication, particularly in diverse and dense populations. As such, this study examined county-level data including population density, population diversity, and hospital structural factors as predictors of patient satisfaction with doctor and nurse communication. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), U.S. Census data, and number of hospital beds were obtained from publicly available Hospital Compare, U.S. Census, and American Hospital Directory websites, respectively. Multivariate regression modeling was performed for the individual dimensions of HCAHPS scores assessing doctor and nurse communication. Standardized partial regression coefficients were used to assess strengths of county-level predictors. County-level factors accounted for 30% and 16% of variability in patient satisfaction with doctor and nurse communication, respectively. College education (β = 0.45) and White ethnicity (β = 0.25) most strongly predicted a favorable rating of doctor and nurse communication, respectively. Primary language (non-English speaking; β = −0.50) most strongly predicted an unfavorable rating of doctor communication, while number of hospital beds (β = −0.16) and foreign-born (β = −0.16) most strongly predicted an unfavorable rating of nurse communication. County-level predictors should be considered when interpreting patient satisfaction with doctor and nurse communication and designing multilevel patient-centered communication improvement strategies. Discordant findings with individual-level factors should be explored further. © 2017 Taylor & Francis.
Journal Title: Health Communication
Volume: 32
Issue: 10
ISSN: 1041-0236
Publisher: Routledge  
Date Published: 2017-10-01
Start Page: 1217
End Page: 1224
Language: English
DOI: 10.1080/10410236.2016.1215001
PROVIDER: scopus
PUBMED: 27612390
DOI/URL:
Notes: Article -- Export Date: 1 September 2017 -- Source: Scopus
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